Make the Switch

What is worse than remembering your passwords? Answer: Changing your passwords.

Humbling…

Covid brain and a resurgence of kindness are two of the irrefutable outcomes of life the past 12 months has brought, as we pass the one year mark of various stages of confinement.

The ‘brain’ syndrome has been occasionally referenced by friends to describe everything from forgetting wallets or mobile phones, to turning the house inside out in search of reading glasses, even starting a Zoom meeting an hour before the prearranged time.

“Oh, that’s just my covid brain at work….” the lame excuse goes.

That said, let’s dwell on kindness.

We’ve looked for and found a heightened sense of courtesy and civility among so many, from professional office staff to small business attendants and neighbors.

The expressions are generous and heartfelt—as in, “this is a challenging time. And by treating you as we’d like to be treated, it feels good. Not only that, but in this situation like none other, it’s the right thing.”

Recently, our neighborhood staged a communal winter bonfire to provide the socialization we need and crave. Appropriately distanced, we shared refreshments and snacks, enjoyed one another’s company, and generally took stock of the blessings endemic to being able to live here while a worldwide pandemic rages.

This tonic was not only an eye-opener, it was humbling for the soul.

Here’s to times ahead full of renewed promise….

Stay well friends!

From Adversity, Opportunity….

Despite the past year’s challenges, many business owners are optimistic about the future.


The past year has wreaked more havoc than a 100-year storm on the world economy, to say nothing of what it has meant to small business owners, the hardest hit.

And though some familiar NW Michigan names and faces will no longer be around when we do emerge from the viral pandemic, it’s not all bad news for small business.

The time tested adage of “from adversity comes opportunity” is reflected among some survivors, many of whom have implemented creative business strategies that a year ago would have seemed unthinkable.

In addition, help on the national level in the form of stimulus checks for individuals, additional PPP loans and enhanced unemployment benefits, have no doubt amped the optimism.

Recent surveys have found that over 20 percent of small business owners are optimistic about what lies ahead, while another 33 percent are somewhat optimistic. And this during a worldwide pandemic, the likes of which has not been experienced since the turn of the century—along with an unstable national political environment marked by disinformation, pusillanimous legislators, and baseless election conspiracy theories.

SCORE, the nationwide (300 chapters and over 10,000 volunteer business mentors), has always been a touchstone for small business entrepreneurs seeking help.

Over the past year it has established a special “Resilence Hub” that leverages its already broad base of services and allows users ready access to a network where people can learn—-from each other and experienced business professionals. And all at no charge.

For more information the northwest’s regional SCORE office is located in Traverse City. Check out their website here: traversecity.score.org.

Making an Authentic Difference

George Kuhn with wife, Betty


Along with “our prayers and thoughts are with the family” and other expressions of sympathy at a time of loss, “making a difference” has become a staple of the grief lexicon.

Upon reading the death notice this week in the Traverse City Record-Eagle of George Kuhn, ‘making a difference’ was what immediately came to mind. 

We first met George and a van full of members of the then fledgling Traverse City Track Club in the late 70’s, as publishers of the Antrim County News, one of several community newspapers to which we were affiliated.

George showed up in support of Mancelona’s first “Nesset/Peterson” memorial/fundraiser distance run. It was clear from that initial meeting that this self-effacing aerobic exercise advocate not only had the respect of a legion of runners of all ages, but led out front by example. He invariably was among the top finishers in his age class.

Later our paths crossed again with the establishment of the White Pine Stampede, the state’s first point to point 50 km cross country ski race.

One of our writers named the event, and most Up North Publications staff had a hand in shaping and staging the event in one form or another.

The Georges (George Kuhn and his longtime ski buddy George Lombard), showed up to support the race, brought ski friends, and lent sage advice on how we could make improvements.

Over subsequent years and events our paths crossed. But we regret never telling him how much of an impact his presence and support meant.

Many of us take from life without fully subscribing to the “giving” balance of the ledger.

George Kuhn showed us how to do both…